Food Photography Tips & Tricks

For those of you who’ve been following along lately, you know that I’m dying inside because I’m currently separated from my dear and ever-trusty, loyal and wonderful camera.

We’ve been through thick and thin together he and I, and I’m just pining in his absence as he is being repaired in a lonesome factory out of state.

Being without my camera for the first time in three years has gotten me thinking about photography. About what I’ve accomplished in my photography and how much my skills have improved. And especially about how much I still want to improve when I do get my camera back and can shoot shoot shoot til my heart’s content.

As I’ve been thinking about all of these photography-related things and about my goals as a food photographer, I have been finding so many fantastic sources all over the web with tips, tricks, and photography wisdom and I’ve rounded them up for my benefit and for yours!

So maybe a few sort-of-good things might actually come from this awful, wretched, not having my beloved camera situation.

At least that is what I’m telling myself.

It makes me feel just a little bit better.

Take a look at these amazing sources for food photography tips! Even if  you’re totally pro, you can always benefit from reviewing the basics. Who knows, you may find a fantastic idea you’ve been missing that could take your photography to the next level!

10. Tasty Food Photography eBook

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  1. says

    Thanks so much for this great round up of tips! I need to improve my food shots, so I can’t wait to start reading through all of these. Happy 4th of July!

  2. says

    Thanks for the round up of tips! I definitely have room to improve. I just bought a 50mm lens, so that has really helped improve my skillz…but I’m still learning! Have a great day!

    xoxo
    A

  3. says

    Awesome tips Tiffany, I only have a cheap point and shoot camera but it has to do for now because there are a lot of things ahead of the list of priorities for a SAHM with kids other than a new camera, that said…this reading can benefit anyone from pros as you mentioned to just regular folks like myself…thanks for sharing! very very helpful! :)

    • says

      I totally get it, the kids and family is top top priority and sometimes moms just have to make sacrifices, so so worth it! Of course though, working with what you have is totally doable and these tips are applicable to everyone and anyone interested is sprucing up their photos! Thanks so much for stopping by Lizbeth!

  4. says

    Pinning this for later, I can’t wait to look through it!! I’m often in despair at my rookie photos, thank you so much for putting this list together for us! Stopping by from Foodie Friday :)
    ~April @DimplesandDelights

    • says

      Oh it was my pleasure April! Improving your food photos can be stressful and daunting, thank goodness so many of the pros have taken the time to share their wisdom! Good luck and thank you for stopping by!!

  5. says

    Great round-up, Tiffany! Thank you so much for sharing this at Marvelous Mondays. Pinning and sharing this on social media tomorrow!

    Julie @ This Gal Cooks

  6. says

    Great round-up of food photog tips! :) Already pinned this one to peruse later. Thank you so much for sharing at Marvelous Mondays this week!

  7. says

    Thanks for this round-up! I’m pretty good at portrait photography so when I started food photography for my blog I thought it would be cake. WRONG. I conveniently forgot that I use natural, outdoor light for my portraits and most times get indoor/filtered/DARK light for my food.
    Reading every single tip I can!

    • says

      I too started out with portrait photography (www.tazurephotography.blogspot.com) and recently made the switch to food, it’s challenging! These tips should give you a little it of a boost though, good luck Joshua!

  8. says

    This post couldn’t have come at a better time. I’m waiting on my NEW camera to come in the mail (it’s my first real one – a dslr), and thanks to you I have all the resources I need on one place! I can’t wait to get started on improving my photos. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

    • says

      Oh, the anticipation is AGONY! My trusty (expensive!) DSLR had a bit of a weak moment two weeks ago and has been across the country getting repaired. It’s coming in the mail today! We can celebrate together! You’re so welcome for the roundup, I hope its helpful for you!! Thanks Laura!

  9. says

    ooooo fun! I’ve pinned this so I can come back when I have more time. Thanks for putting this all together. Food Photography is something I’m always trying to work on…
    emily @ Nap-timecreations.com

  10. says

    Nice I also share with you something hope this helpful for you my friends. The size of the opening, which is regulated by a series of fins encroaching from the edge of the lens barrel, is measured in so-called f-stops, written f/2.8, f/5.9 and so on, with smaller numbers denoting wider apertures. If you find this inverse relationship tricky to remember, imagine instead that it relates not to the size of the hole but the amount of each fin encroaching into the opening. A narrow opening is regulated by a large amount of each fin encroaching into the barrel, and so has a high f-stop number, such as f/16, f/18 and so on. A wide opening is characterised by a small number, such as f/3.2, with only a small amount of each fin obscuring the light.
    intellectual property right